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Monday, March 30


“Let the husband render to his wife the affection due her, and likewise also the wife to her husband.”
1Co 7:3 NKJV

SHOW AFFECTION TO ONE ANOTHER

The Taj Mahal is one of the most beautiful and costly tombs ever built. And there’s a legend that surrounds it. When the favorite wife of Indian ruler Shah Jahan died, he ordered it built as a memorial to her. He placed her casket in the middle of a parcel of land, and construction literally began around it. But several years into the venture, his grief for his wife gave way to his passion for the project. One day while he was surveying the site, he reportedly stumbled over a wooden box and had it thrown out. It was months before he realized it was his wife’s casket. The original purpose for the memorial—got lost in the details of construction! There’s a lesson here: It’s called “misplaced values.” If you’re a husband and a father, your wife and children probably appreciate the things you work to provide. But do you know what they really want? You! Your time. Your attention. Your affection! J. Paul Getty was one of the world’s richest men, yet he failed miserably with his own family. He wrote: “I’ve never been given to envy, save for the envy I feel toward those people who have the ability to make a marriage work and endure happily. It’s an art I’ve never been able to master.” So in your quest to build your Taj Mahal, try to remember the purpose for which you are building it. “Let the husband render to his wife the affection due her, and likewise also the wife to her husband.”

Tuesday, March 31

“Don’t let the sun go down while you are still angry, for anger gives a foothold to the devil.”
Eph 4:26-27 NLT

WHAT HAPPENS IN THE AFTERMATH?

A marriage and family expert writes: “It’s not the fights that should worry married couples; it’s what happens when the battles are over. Almost all husbands and wives experience conflict from time to time, which is not necessarily unhealthy to the relationship. A verbal spat that stays within reasonable limits can open the windows and give a couple a chance to vent their frustrations and release some steam. The important question, however, is what happens after a fight is over? In healthy relationships confrontation ends in forgiveness, in drawing closer together, in deeper respect and understanding, and sometimes in greater physical intimacy. But in unstable marriages conflict is never entirely resolved. This is a very dangerous situation where the consequences of one battle begin to overlap with a prelude to the next. It’s a good idea for couples to take a closer look at what happens in the aftermath of confrontation. Are there things that you’ve said or done that have grieved your partner? Do you need to ask forgiveness for attacking the self-worth of your spouse instead of focusing on the issues that divided you? Are there substantive matters that haven’t yet been resolved? If so, deal with them quickly before they can fester and erode the relationship from within.” The apostle Paul understood this principle clearly. “Don’t sin by letting anger control you. Don’t let the sun go down while you are still angry, for anger gives a foothold to the devil.” He wrote these words two millenniums ago, but they’re still great marital advice today.